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Another Argument by Twitter

I hate argument by Twitter. Atheist @Monicks tweeted the following on Jan 5, 2011:

If there really were a god, nobody would need faith!

Faith = Trust. Sorry, but you FAIL–once we see that God exists, then we would still need to trust him. That trust is informed by reason (not opposed to it), by virtue of God’s past dealings with humanity. Those dealings are described in the Old Testament, and the sovereignty of God is re-enforced in both Testaments. God has ordained the end as well as the means: he is in total control. As Jesus aptly put it, “Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters” (Lk 11:23).

The issue is your definition of “faith.” It is most emphatically not “blind faith,” or “belief in spite of overwhelming evidence.”

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About Cory Tucholski

I'm a born-again Christian, amateur apologist and philosopher, father of 3. Want to know more? Check the "About" page!

Posted on January 13, 2011, in God, Humor and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. !

    That is one of the clearest and succinct explanations of a person’s definition of the word faith that I have ever come across.

    Many other people write thousands of words, but only make the definition more confusing.

  2. I have faith in my lack of faith. I walked away from God many years ago. I then began to study all religions through the eyes of a non bias theological approach. Faith is simply believing in something that cannot be proved to be real or false. I write many things about faith and not so many of them are nice towards Christianity. I love the Bible it is a great book. Perhaps my anger towards God is because he turned his back on me when I needed him the most, when I was a vulnerable child trying to find safety and he gave me none.

    • I have your blog on my to-read list.

      My turn to applaud you. A common denominator in many stories of ex-Christians is the feeling that God somehow abandoned them. I’m sure that Job felt abandoned, too. Paul seemed a bit ticked that God wouldn’t remove the thorn in his flesh–some unnamed but persistent sin that held him bound (some suspect he might have been gay, but that’s pure conjecture based on his repeated condemnation of homosexuality [which is always interpreted as “homophobia” nowadays] and his celibacy). It’s normal to be angry at God at certain points; you, however, openly admit your skepticism might be colored by that anger. Most skeptics won’t admit that, and they get extremely defensive when the apologist points out their anger in the words they use toward their former faith. The Bible assures us we will face trials and hardship, but that our faith (trust) is perfected and made stronger through these trials. Sometimes, however, the person falls away.

      I still disagree with the repeated assertions by skeptics that faith is simply believing without proof. At the end of the day, faith is trust, nothing more, nothing less.

  1. Pingback: On Not Posting for a Few Days, or, 2011: Year of E-books « Josiah Concept Ministries

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