Advertisements

Bad Denver Archdiocese!

Archbishop Charles Chaput of the Denver archdiocese has recently backed a decision by a local school to expel a child because his parents happen to be a lesbian couple. Jimmy Akin, a staunch defender of Catholic moral theology, naturally sides with the bishop on this and writes his defense here. Of course, good Catholics don’t argue with the bishop once the decision is made.

I’m not Catholic anymore, so I have the luxury of disagreeing, which of course I do. Vehemently.

It is the unfortunate tendency of those who claim to be Christians to treat homosexuality as some sort of super-sin. Cries of “I’m gay!” mean that the crier is immediately ostracized from the Christian community. As if same sex attraction is somehow unforgivable.

Men, haven’t you ever seen a fine specimen of maleness and wondered what it was that drew women to him? Maybe you started to find yourself attracted, too?

I know that women judge the attractiveness of other women, so I’m not even going to as that same rhetorical question for the females.

This type of thing is hardly earth-shaking, and I much doubt that it would be sinful. Perhaps that attraction gets carried to its extreme and then you find yourself experimenting. Then you find yourself liking the results of your dalliance. It could happen to anyone.

Maybe you’re one of those who never found anything attractive about the opposite sex and always gravitated to the same sex. Again, this is hardly earth-shaking. This kind of stuff happens.

Isn’t this how any sin happens? I fantasize about killing my annoying neighbor. The fantasies become more real, and suddenly the opportunity presents itself to make them come true. Next thing I know, I’m on trial because the police found my hairs and a few carpet fibers from my house on the body.

I’ve previously argued that homosexuality is sin, but not a super sin. There is no super-sin that God will not forgive save one. The tendency of the Christian to treat homosexuality as some sort of super-sin and ostracize its practitioners is one of the largest failings of the church to reach sinners badly in need of the grace offered to us through Jesus Christ.

And now, Archbishop Chaput and his defenders are continuing this grave error. By not admitting this child because of his parents’ homosexuality, they are missing a great opportunity to witness to this young man and to teach him that his moms’ behavior is wrong. He will now grow up being taught by example that homosexuality is right and will miss what may be the only opportunity the church may ever have to show him it is sin.

No kudos to Chaput. He is eliminating whatever Christian influence that this boy may have had in his life, and sending the message that we don’t want him because his parents are sinners. Whatever happened to “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest” (Mt 11:28)? Or, better, Deuteronomy 24:16?

Advertisements

About Cory Tucholski

I'm a born-again Christian, amateur apologist and philosopher, father of 3. Want to know more? Check the "About" page!

Posted on March 16, 2010, in Roman Catholicism, Sin and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. >>By not admitting this child because of his parents’ homosexuality, they are missing a great opportunity to witness to this young man and to teach him that his moms’ behavior is wrong. He will now grow up being taught by example that homosexuality is right and will miss what may be the only opportunity the church may ever have to show him it is sin.

    I do not believe this is the opportunity that the church has squandered. I agree that the church does exist to teach us what is wrong, and it should teach it, and it would teach these kids that their mom is wrong, but it is not the real missed opportunity, because the kids will already know homosexuality is wrong through other means. After all, God writes His law on the heart, and so the child will actually know that this is wrong; similar to an atheist not needing church to know God exists.

    The real opportunity missed is to teach these children God’s love. By growing up in a (presumedly) loving homosexual home, this child will grow up to love his mother, which he should, without hindrance. However, what the church risks doing in its decision to exclude itself from this child’s life is teaching that homosexuals are not loved by the church, and nor are their children. What a horrible horrible lesson. In a more practical sense, the church also gives up the opportunity to put real male role models in this child’s life, not to mention real opportunities to love the mother into the kingdom, showing her her sin through love. Christ was so loving to sinners in the Gospel. Christians do not appear loving to non-Christians anymore… or at least the church doesn’t. I don’t know when that happened, but I would suggest that that is the real tragedy, and is accurately reflected in its expulsion of this child.

    • That’s pretty dead-on. I missed that. This decision does tend to teach that homosexuals are excluded from God’s love, which isn’t true at all. Thanks for pointing that out!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: